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How to avoid buying a flood damage car - Tips


After the flood that rocked the United States lately, it was reported that millions of cars are damaged and affected, what this means is that these cars will be sold either as scrap or as at a cheaper rate. These are some tips to guide when you want cars and how not to fall a prey into buying a flood car.

Check the Vehicle's History
Car shoppers should follow that example. A history report will detail the vehicle's past, including the states in which it's been registered. A vehicle history report should reveal any branding for flood damage, even if someone has washed the vehicle's title by moving it through states with differing regulations.

How to Spot a Flood-Damaged Car

In addition to getting a vehicle history report, here are some basic tips from the National Automobile Dealers Association that will minimize the risk to used-car buyers:

1. Be alert to unusual odours. Musty or mouldy odours inside the car are a sign of mildew buildup from prolonged exposure to water. It might be coming from an area the seller is unable to completely clean. Beware of a strong air freshener or cleaning solution scent since it may indicate the seller is trying to cover up something. Run the air-conditioner to see if a mouldy smell comes from the vents.

2. Look for discoloured carpeting.
Large stains or differences in colour between lower and upper upholstery sections may indicate that standing water was in the vehicle. A used car with brand-new upholstery is also a warning sign since a seller may have tried to remove the flood-damaged upholstery altogether.

3. Examine the exterior for water buildup. Signs may include fogging inside headlamps or taillights and damp or muddy areas where water naturally pools, such as overhangs inside the wheel well. A water line might be noticeable in the engine compartment or the trunk, indicating that the car sat in standing water.

4. Inspect the undercarriage.
Look for evidence of rust and flaking metal that would not normally be associated with late-model vehicles.

5. Be suspicious of dirt buildup in unusual areas.
These include areas such as around the seat tracks or the upper carpeting under the glove compartment. Have an independent mechanic look for caked mud or grit in alternator crevices, behind wiring harnesses, and around the small recesses of starter motors, power steering pumps and relays.

Credit:
Edmunds

1 comment:

  1. The principal level is because of clear water. It could be broken pipes or water spots.flood damage cleanup companies

    ReplyDelete

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